‘The Good Doctor’ struggles on life support

The-Good-Doctor-Poster

The Good Doctor (2011)

Directed by Lance Daly

6/10  PG-13

“The Good Doctor” is best described, I guess, as one of those indie movies that favor the use of silence and obscure music over effective dialogue. Like a phlebotomist missing the preferred vein, leading to unnecessary holes in your flesh, screenwriter John Enbom (“Veronica Mars”) leaves holes in this terminally ill script, unfortunate mistakes in an otherwise interesting concept. Dr. House meets Dr. Feelgood in this heart-stopping tale of a calculating chemist, but without a satisfying ending or an especially exciting middle, the story survived, only barely, on life support.

Dr. Martin Blake (Orlando Bloom) is a bad doctor – maybe not in the medical sense, but definitely in the ethical sense. When a looker of a the-good-doctor07young female patient (Riley Keough) is assigned to his care, Martin has a special case of unhealthy obsession at first sight. But with her simple condition getting better, how will Martin ensure that he can see his new love again?

I decided to watch the movie based almost entirely on its exciting premise: a young doctor erasing the line in the sand when he falls in love with a patient. Unfortunately, what had the potential to be a spellbinding thriller turned into a slow-burning medical drama. “The Good Doctor” is why I stopped watching “Grey’s Anatomy” five years ago.

The movie is described unknowingly well when Keough’s character Diane describes how she feels after an operation: “Okay, kinda groggy.” That’s it. Slow, quiet. Suspenseful, but not exciting. Interesting, but not entertaining. Anyone have any defibrillators?

Time of death: 11:56 a.m.

“The Good Doctor” is on Blu-ray and DVD.

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